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Pronunciations

Pronouncing Joyce
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Proper names in Joyce's writing can be pronounced in Dublin English in ways which are surprising to those unfamiliar with the dialect. Often the stress falls in unexpected places (as in D'Olier Street), and sometimes the pronunciation itself might not be guessed by speakers outside Ireland (as in Clongowes). The entries below offer Dublin English pronunciations of many proper names in Ulysses and other works - the pronunciations appear in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) transcription and in audio format. Suggestions for other problematic terms which we could add to this audio glossary would be welcome.

    The pronunciations are NOT intended to represent Joyce's own pronunciation of these terms, but show them represented in a variety of modern "mainstream" Dublin English which is indicative of, but not identical with, the Irish pronunciation with which Joyce would have been familiar.

     A pronunciation key may be found here. We are grateful for the advice of Professor Raymond Hickey on the choice of the key, though any errors of implementation are our own, and to Dubliner and Joyce expert Robert Nicholson for providing the audio representations.

    To view these locations circled on Bacon's Plan of Dublin and Suburbs or the Ordnance Survey inch-to-the-mile map of Co. Dublin (c1898 and 1900 respectively: courtesy of Ian Gunn), click the names in the left-hand column (and then enlarge the map view).
For additional information on these locations, please see Ian Gunn and Clive Hart James Joyce's Dublin: a topographical guide to the Dublin of Ulysses (Thames & Hudson: 2004)



  Adelaide road

the original jews' temple was here too before they built their synagogue over in Adelaide road.

   
/ˈædəle:d/
 


  Aherlow

Sir Patrick Dun's hospital, Cape Clear, the glen of Aherlow, Lynch's castle, the Scotch house

   
/æhəɹˈlou/
 


 
Ailesbury Road

From Ailesbury road, Clyde road, artisans’ dwellings, north Dublin union, lord mayor in his gingerbread coach, old queen in a bathchair.

   
/ˈe:lzbərɪ/
 

 
  Aldborough House

Near Aldborough House Father Conmee thought of that spendthrift nobleman

 
 
/ˈɒ:ldb
ərə/
 


 
Alexandra Basin

A Palgrave Murphy boat was put off the ways at Alexandra basin, the only launch that year.

   
/ælɛkˈsændrə/
 


  Amiens Street

in the direction of Amiens street railway terminus

   
/ˈe:miənz/
 


 
Annesley bridge

At Annesley bridge the tram halted

   
/ˈænzlɪ/
 


 
Antient Concert
   Rooms

Antient concert rooms. Nothing on there.

   
/ˈe:nʃ(ə)nt/
 


  Antrim

A sire in Ultonian Antrim bade it him.

   
/ˈæntrɪm/
 


 
Arbour Hill

I was just passing the time of day with old Troy of the D. M. P. at the corner of Arbour hill there and be damned but a bloody sweep came along and he near drove his gear into my eye.

   
/ˈa:ɹbəɹ/
 


  Arbutus place

Arbutus place: Pleasants street: pleasant old times.

   
/a:rˈbju:təs/
 


  Athlone

the Athlone poursuivant and Ulster King of Arms.

   
/ˈæθloun/
 


 
Artane

Just nice time to walk to Artane

   
/a:rˈte:n/
 


 
Aungier Street

curtain pole and revolving shutter manufacturer, 16 Aungier street

   
/ˈe:nʤəɹ/
 


 
Bachelor’s Walk

I’m just running round to Bachelor’s walk, Mr Bloom said, about this ad of Keyes’s. Want to fix it up.

   
/ˈbætʃələɹ/
 


 
Baggot street

In Ely place, Baggot street, Duke’s lawn, thence through Merrion green up to Holles street a swash of water flowing that was before bonedry and not one chair or coach or fiacre seen about but no more crack after that first.

   
/ˈbægət/
 


 
Ballsbridge

Ballsbridge. Tourists over for the show.

   
/bɒ:lzˈbrɪʤ/
older /ˈbɒ:lz ˈbrɪʤ/ reflects spelling as two words
 



  Ballybough bridge

What did you do in the cattlecreep behind Kilbarrack? [...] And under Ballybough bridge?

   
/bælɪˈbɒ:x/
 


 
Belvedere

were they getting on well at Belvedere?

   
/bɛlvəˈdiəɹ/
 



 
Beresford place

Between this point and the high at present unlit warehouses of Beresford place Stephen thought to think of Ibsen.

   
/ˈbɛrəsfəd/
 


 
Berkeley Road

Quick warm sunlight came running from Berkeley road

   
/ˈba:klɪ/
 



 
Berkeley street

As they turned into Berkeley street a streetorgan near the Basin sent over and after them a rollicking rattling song of the halls.

   
/ˈba:klɪ/
 


 
Brian Boruimhe
  House

They drove on past Brian Boroimhe house

   
/bəˈru:/
 



 
Brighton square

the very 1st opportunity he got a chance in Brighton square running into my bedroom pretending the ink got on his hands to wash it off with the Albion milk and sulphur soap I used to use and the gelatine still round it.

   
/ˈbraɪtɒn/
 


 
Burgh quay

thirdly, a conflict between professional etiquette and professional emulation concerning the recent erections of the Grand Lyric Hall on Burgh Quay and the Theatre Royal in Hawkins street.

   
/bə:ɹ/
 


 
Cahill's corner

From Cahill's corner the reverend Hugh C. Love, M. A., made obeisance unperceived

   
/ˈkæhɪl/
 



 
Capel street

Must get that Capel street library book renewed

   
/ˈke:pl/
 



  Carlisle bridge

John Mulligan, the manager of the Hibernian bank, gave me a very sharp eye yesterday on Carlisle bridge as if he remembered me.

   
/ˈka:rlaɪl/ or /ka:rˈlaɪl/
 


 
Carrickmines

there is ever heard a trampling, cackling, roaring, lowing, bleating, bellowing, rumbling, grunting, champing, chewing, of sheep and pigs and heavyhooved kine from pasturelands of Lusk and Rush and Carrickmines and from the streamy vales of Thomond.

   
/kærɪkˈmaɪnz/
 


 
Cecilia street

Playing it slow, a girl, night I came home, the girl. Door of the stables near Cecilia street. Ought to invent dummy pianos for that.

   
/səˈsi:lɪə/
 


 
Chapelizod

Ignatius Gallaher we all know and his Chapelizod boss

   
/ʧæplˈɪzəd/
 



  Charlemont Mall

J. and T. Davy, family grocers, 1 Charlemont Mall, Grand Canal

   
/ˈʧa:rləmɒ:nt/
 


  Charleville Mall

Moored under the trees of Charleville Mall Father Conmee saw a turfbarge

   
/ˈʧa:rləvɪl/
 


  Clanbrassil street

I, Rudolph Virag, now resident at no 52 Clanbrassil street, Dublin [...] intend henceforth upon all occasions and at all times to be known by the name of Rudolph Bloom.

   
/klænˈbrʌs(ə)l/
 


  Clarendon st

the last concert I sang at where its over a year ago when was it St Teresas hall Clarendon st

   
/ˈklærəndən/
 


  Clongowes

When I put my face into it in the basin at Clongowes

   
/ˈklɒngouz/
 



  Clonmacnois

the lovely lakes of Killarney, the ruins of Clonmacnois, Cong Abbey, Glen Inagh and the Twelve Pins

   
/klɒnməkˈnɒɪz/
 


  Clonsilla

Wonder if the dodge works now getting dicky meat off the train at Clonsilla.

   
/ˈklɒnsɪlə/
 


  Clonskea

handsomemarriedwomanrubbed againstwidebehindinClonskeatram

   
/ˈklɒnski:/
 


  Clonturk park

she would never forget her hero boy who went to his death with a song on his lips as if he were but going to a hurling match in Clonturk park.

   
/ˈklɒntə:ɹk/
 


 
Coadys lane

if the little man he showed me dribbling along in the wet all by himself round by Coadys lane

   
/ˈkoudɪz/
 


  Connemara

A timepiece of striated Connemara marble, stopped at the hour of 4.46 a.m. on the 21 March 1896

   
/kɒnəˈma:rə/
 


  the Coombe

Did you hear that one, he asked them, about Mulcahy from the Coombe?

   
/ku:m/
 


 
Dalkey

that was an accident coming down Dalkey hill 

   
/ˈdɒ:kɪ/
 


 
Dawson street

Mr Bloom walked towards Dawson street, his tongue brushing his teeth smooth.

   
/ˈdɒ:sən/
 


 
Denzille Lane

The Denzille lane boys. Hell, blast ye! Scoot.

   
/ˈdɛnzɪl/
 


  Denzille street

Remember the summer morning she was born, running to knock up Mrs Thornton in Denzille street.

   
/ˈdɛnzɪl/
 


 
Dignam’s court

Mr Denis J Maginni, professor of dancing &c, … walking with grave deportment most respectfully took the curbstone as he passed lady Maxwell at the corner of Dignam’s court.

   
/ˈdɪgnəm/
 


 
D'Olier Street

Messrs Flower and M'Donald of 14 D'Olier street

   
/dəˈliəɹ/
 


 
Dorset Street

He walked back along Dorset street

   
/dɒ:ɹˈsɛt/
or /ˈdɒ:ɹsət/
 


  Drumcondra

Mina Kennedy, 4 Lismore terrace, Drumcondra with Idolores, a queen, Dolores, silent.

   
/drʌmˈkɒndrə/
 


 
Earlsfort terrace

Sir Frederick Falkiner going into the freemasons’ hall. Solemn as Troy. After his good lunch in Earlsfort terrace.

   
/ˈə:ɹzfət/
 


 
Eccles Street

I live in Eccles street

   
/ˈɛk(ə)lz/
also locally
/ˈɛkləs/
 


  Ely place

In Ely place, Baggot street, Duke's lawn, thence through Merrion green up to Holles street

   
/ˈi:laɪ/
 


 
Eustace street

Girl in Eustace street hallway Monday was it settling her garter.

   
/ˈju:stəs/
 


 
Finglas Road

The carriage steered left for Finglas road

   
/ˈfɪngləs/
 


 
Fitzgibbon street

Father Conmee gave a letter from his breast to Master Brunny Lynam and pointed to the red pillarbox at the corner of Fitzgibbon street.

   
/fɪtzˈgɪbən/
 


 
Fownes Street

In Fownes's street

   
/ˈfæʊnz/
 


 
Fumbally’s lane

Two Dublin vestals, Stephen said, elderly and pious, have lived fifty and fiftythree years in Fumbally’s lane.

   
/ˈfʌmbəlɪ/
 


  Galway

Save them, says the citizen, the giant ash of Galway and the chieftain elm of Kildare

   
/ˈgɒ:l(ˌ)we:/
 


 
Governor street

Mrs Opisso in Governor street O what a name Id go and drown myself in the first river if I had a name like her

   
/ˈgʌvəɹnəɹ/
 


 
Grafton street

In Grafton street Master Dignam saw a red flower in a toff’s mouth and a swell pair of kicks on him

   
/ˈgra:ftən/
 


  Grantham street

she was a lovely woman magnificent head of hair on her down to her waist tossing it back like that like Kitty OShea in Grantham street

   
/ˈgrænθəm/
 


 
Grosvenor

That one at the Grosvenor this morning

   
/ˈgrouvnəɹ/
 


  Heytesbury street

said he had a farm in the county Down off a hop-of-my-thumb by the name of Moses Herzog over there near Heytesbury street.

   
/ˈhe:tsbərɪ/
 



 
Holles Street

the lying-in hospital in Holles street

   
/ˈhɒləs/
 


 
Howth

on the proud promontory of dear old Howth

   
/hout̪/
 


 
Jammet's

that highclass whore in Jammet's

   
/ˈʒæme:z/
 


  Jervis street

At the Dolphin they halted to allow the ambulance car to gallop past them for Jervis street.

   
/ˈʤə:ɹvɪs/
 



 
Kavanagh

the shaded door of Kavanagh's winerooms

   
/ˈkævənə/
 



 
Kenilworth square

drawers that was the evening coming along Kenilworth square he kissed me in the eye of my glove

   
/ˈkɛnəlwə:ɹθ/
 


  Killiney hill

expecting you to walk up Killiney hill then for example at that picnic all staysed up

   
/kɪˈlaɪnɪ/
 



  Lansdowne road

On Northumberland and Lansdowne roads His Excellency acknowledged punctually salutes from rare male walkers

   
/ˈlænzdæʊn/
 


 
Larchet's

Larchet's, Holles street hospital, Burke's. Eh? I am watching you.

   
/ˈla:rʃe:z/
 


 
Leinster Street

Turkish and Warm Baths, 11 Leinster street

   
/ˈlɛnstəɹ/
 


 
Lincoln Place

 in Lincoln place outside the premises of F. W. Sweny and Co (Limited)

   
/ˈlɪŋk(ə)n/
 


 
Mabbot street

The Mabbot street entrance of nighttown, before which stretches an uncobbled tramsiding set with skeleton tracks, red and green will-o’-the-wisps and danger signals.

   
/ˈmæbət/
 

   corner

A onelegged sailor crutched himself round MacConnell's corner

   
/məˈkɒnəlz/
 


  Marlborough street

There was a dosshouse in Marlborough street, Mrs Maloney's

   
/ˈmɒ:ɹlbərə/
 



  Mecklenburgh
    street

I called upon the bard Kinch at his summer residence in upper Mecklenburgh street

   
/ˈmeklənbəɹg/
 



 
Michan

Is he buried in saint Michan's?

   
/ˈmaɪk(ə)n/ or /ˈmɪk(ə)n/
 


 
Montgomery Street

 the livery stables at the corner of Montgomery street

   
/mɒntˈgɒm(ə)rɪ/
 


 
Monypeny’s corner

Five tallwhitehatted sandwichmen between Monypeny’s corner and the slab where Wolfe Tone’s statue was not.

   
/ˈmʌnɪpɛnɪ/
 


  Mountjoy square

Father Conmee stopped three little schoolboys at the corner of Mountjoy square.

   
/ˈmæʊntʤɒɪ/