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Showing 1-10 of 12 results for "wales "

FitzGerald 30 Aug 2013, 14:20 by JJON Editors

Edward FitzGerald at sea: Oxen notesheet 17   Under the heading “Sea” Joyce listed a number of terms in Oxen notesheet 17 1 that he found in a curious collection of ... boch                         Francis 25, 121 : Lewis bach [OED, bach: A term of endearment common in Wales and the border counties, freq. following a personal name: dear, little one, friend.] (p. 25 ...

Joyce's Allusions ‎>‎ FitzGerald

anybody here 4 Jun 2014, 11:39 by JJON Editors

“Is there anybody here for there?”, as the railway porter asked the passengers   U 15.4023-5:                                        ZOE (Twirls around herself , heeltapping.) Dance. Anybody here for there? Who’ll dance ... the train, and asked " Is there anyone there for here? " Arrow (Sydney, New South Wales) (1896), 18 July p. 16      The story became a staple joke in newspaper “humour” columns ...

Joyce's Allusions ‎>‎ anybody here

hog 31 May 2015, 01:23 by John Simpson

Orphans in the Underworld   U 15.1889-91:                                    THE ARTANE ORPHANS You hig, you hog, you dirty dog! You think the ladies love you! Bloom is pictured with asses’ ears ... December 2008. 2 Bell’s Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer (Sydney, New South Wales) (1849), 24 February, p. 1. 3 Diary of Josiah Cocking (1892) (University of Newcastle library ...

Joyce's Allusions ‎>‎ hog

Malory 3 Mar 2013, 02:55 by JJON Editors

Malory and Sir Leopold, King U 14.167-86: This meanwhile this good sister stood by the door and begged [...] Woman's woe with wonder pondering. According to Joyce’s ... from the Lady of the Lake, is challenged by King Rience, lord of North Wales and Ireland. It ends, save for the alliterative Anglo-Saxon-style line, with the Lancelot ...

Joyce's Allusions ‎>‎ Malory

Opal hush 30 Aug 2013, 02:02 by John Simpson

From Swerve of Shore to Bend of Bay Area: the Afterlife of Opal Hush 7.782-3: What do you think really of that hermetic crowd, the opal hush poets ... and prose; preferring creme de menthe and opal hush to metheglin or stout. Beautiful Wales (London: A & C Black, 1905), p. 11      Frustratingly, Thomas says nothing more about the drink ...

Joyce's Allusions ‎>‎ Opal hush

Watching 31 May 2015, 00:41 by John Simpson

Unlawfully watching and/or besetting   U 15.732-4:                     FIRST WATCH (reads) Henry Flower. No fixed abode. Unlawfully watching and besetting. Don Gifford is quite right to identify the phrase ... those coming from a distance, in case of any strike". Empire (Sydney, New South Wales) (1872), 20 March p. 2      But despite the popular usage, the Act in fact uses ...

Joyce's Words ‎>‎ Watching

give and take 4 Jun 2014, 02:23 by John Simpson

Give and take is not fair play   U 15.3514-18:                   ZOE Give a thing and take it back God’ll ask you where is that You’ll say you ... S/0007/S.0007.192606100006.html. 2 See, for example: Bye-gones, relating to Wales and Border Counties (1901), p. 313; T. P.’s & Cassell’s Weekly (1911), 1 August ...

Joyce's Allusions ‎>‎ give and take

Pope 1 Mar 2014, 01:09 by John Simpson

Kicking the Pope before us   U 15.4717-18: (In strident discord peasants and townsmen of Orange and Green factions sing Kick the Pope and Daily, daily sing to Mary ... alternately the “Dead March” and " Kick the Pope ". Freeman's Journal (Sydney, New South Wales) (1864), 19 October p. 1 Mr. T. D. Sullivan (Dublin, College Green) […] In Belfast and ...

Joyce's Allusions ‎>‎ Pope

Gerald and Brendan 29 Aug 2013, 01:01 by John Simpson

Gerard and Brendan Gallaher: the next generation   U 10.41-4: Yes: they were from Belvedere. The little house. Aha. And were they good boys at school? O. That was ... Journal (1896) 29 January. 5 Joe’s estate at death amounted to £500: England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (1894) (Index of Wills and Administrations) p. 144. 6 The likely candidates ...

Joyce's People ‎>‎ Gallaher ‎>‎ Gerald and Brendan

forty 31 May 2015, 02:42 by John Simpson

Fair and forty goes far in a day   U 16.1550-1: the cause of many liaisons between still attractive married women getting on for fair and forty and younger ... popular mind with King George IV (reigned 1820-30, but Regent, as Prince of Wales, from 1811 during his father’s “madness”), who had conducted an affair and then in ...

Joyce's Allusions ‎>‎ forty